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People say stuff like "People at the end of their lives say that they wish they had spent less time working and had kept in touch with friends more", and I have no reason to doubt that this is in fact what people at the end of their lives say, but I'm skeptical that what people at the end of their lives say is a good guide to how to live. Seems like their perspective would be no less skewed by their circumstances than a younger person's would.

The stanza about being a soldier in WWI makes a lot more thematic sense this way. It's all about being part of the unregarded masses that society exploits and discards.

Also, it rhymes better with "made it run".

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All through my childhood, I misheard the lyrics to Brother Can You Spare a Dime. I thought it was "once I built a railroad, now it's gone" -- implying "I was on top of the world, built my own railroad, but times changed, and all my wealth is gone now."

But it's really "now it's *done*". That changes it all. The singer didn't fall from wealth. He was a laborer, and got laid off when his work was complete and they didn't need him any more.

Our society would be a lot less messed up if we just let kids grow beards. If you have a beard, you don't have to prove your masculinity in any other way.

Shouldn't extreme pain be described as incruciating instead of excruciating?

Some titles of games currently listed on Steam for purchase and/or wishlisting:
The Turing Test (a Portal-like puzzle game set in space)
Pascal's Wager (a dark fantasy action RPG)
Ship of Theseus (a sci-fi FPS)

WandaVision, Gnosticism 

Seriously, interpreting WandaVision through a Gnostic lens is the most interesting way to watch it, because it messes with the formula in ways that other blatantly gnostic works don't. It centers the Demiurge's viewpoint! The Demiurge is trapped in the false world with everyone else! There are *two separate* Sofia figures, bringing truth from outside, but one is good and one is evil, and the evil one is more effective!

Anyway, this is something that comes to mind whenever I see people online extolling the virtues of some investment vehicle.

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If you walk away without engaging them at all, they respond with scorn and insults. But the very harshest and most hurtful invective is reserved for people who commit the direst of sins: getting off the bus. This includes both people who got tired of waiting for it to start, and people who stayed on all the way to their intended destination.

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"You're just prejudiced against it because you've bought into big oil propaganda. Really, the weight is nothing when it's shared by so many people. And once it gets going, it's a lot easier than walking!"

It's all obvious bunk, but it's a waste of time to argue with them. They're committed. The longer they've been waiting for enough passengers to start the bus, the less inclined they are to change their minds.

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But the thing is, it *does* have passengers -- basically, victims of the sunk costs fallacy, people who paid their fare, usually not understanding what they were getting into, and are unwilling to just waste that by getting off the bus.

Because it has trouble attracting enough passengers to lift it from the inside, it usually sits at a bus stop for hours, the passengers trying to get things going by yelling at passersby out the windows about how great it is on the bus.

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I recall once riffing with some friends on the topic of absurd metropolitan bus lines. "Ah yes, the 362. The city's only completely vertical bus route." That sort of thing.

One of my suggestions was a bus that has no engine, and is powered by the passengers lifting it up from the inside and running, Flintstones-style. Conceived as the ultimate in fuel efficiency, but ultimately not very popular with passengers.

(And as an added bonus, they can print the same directions on different-sized cans)

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What I mean is: Enemies might choose to cut across an obstacle if the resulting path is, say, ten tiles shorter than going around it. Maybe pure barricades would have a larger weight than gun turrets. Maybe they'd increase in weight when upgraded. Heck, maybe the weight would affect different types of enemy to different degrees -- like a generalization of flying units that ignore obstacles.

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So, in the sort of Tower Defense game where you can place obstacles to affect the enemies' path, usually there's a hard rule against cutting them off from their goal entirely. But some games instead apply a rule that enemies can cut across your obstacles, but only do it if it's absolutely necessary. By cutting them off, you're just relinquishing control over their path.

It might be interesting to make cutting across the obstacles weighted, but weighted relatively lightly.

A bit of consumer UI design that I find a little brilliant: That canned juice concentrates specify the amount of water to dilute them with not in liters or in cups/quarts but in *canfuls*, thereby unobtrusively getting the user to automatically rinse out the can without making it seem like an additional chore.

Some titles of games I've seen:
Terraforming Mars
Surviving Mars
Waking Mars
Unearthing Mars

Is there a reason for this pattern? Some title they're all imitating? Is there just something about Mars that makes us want to apply participles to it, or something about participles that make us want to apply them to Mars?

Steven Universe Future spoilers 

Two thoughts on Steven's proposal to Connie:

- It seems Steven's default idea of marriage is permafusion. This was surprising at first, but it makes a lot of sense that he would think this way when you consider his role models.

- Speaking of role models, it occurs to me that in seeking to run away from his problems by abandoning himself and permanently becoming a different person, he's basically emulating his mother.

The reason America's rail system is so substandard is that we're unwilling to devote resources to improving it, and the reason we won't devote resources to improving it is that we think cars are better than trains, and the reason we think cars are better than trains is that we have such a substandard rail system.

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