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Programming isn't about what you know; it's about what you can figure out.

Every great developer you know got there by solving problems they were unqualified to solve until they actually did it.

@LoganDice I'm in the middle of "helping" a postdoc researcher debug a (popular) contributed R package. Because I keep breaking it in novel ways and presenting them new problems, after I hack at it for a while.

@InspectorCaracal @LoganDice I feel the same way about statistical methods. I can't give literature citations for many of the techniques I use, because I got there by bashing different things I do know together until it worked (with a fair bit of cussedness involved).

@LoganDice I've been coding in one form or another on and off for over 20 years, and when I unravel a tricky problem and create a new piece of code that does what I will it to do, I still feel like Tom Hanks declaring "I have made fire!" in Castaway. Every. Single. Time.

@LoganDice Programming can make you feel like a total idiot in one second, only to feel like the smartest person to ever exist in the next

@LoganDice Somewhere I remember hearing that it's better to be good at doing things you're not good at than really anything else. That advice stuck with me.

@cjd @LoganDice just not being afraid to learn things than nobody around you knows seems to be sufficient here.

@LoganDice I would go further -- Life isn't about what you know; it's about what you can figure out.

Every great person you know got there by solving problems they were unqualified to solve until they actually did it.

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