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Bradley Momberger @air_hadoken@mastodon.social

this rings so true omg "Contrary to common belief, the volume of face-to-face interaction decreased significantly (approx. 70%) in [two field studies transitions to open office plans], with an associated increase in electronic interaction. In short, rather than prompting increasingly vibrant face-to-face collaboration, open architecture appeared to trigger a natural human response to socially withdraw from officemates and interact instead over email and IM." rstb.royalsocietypublishing.or

why are all of the entries about math on wikipedia so bad 😐😐😐😐😐😐😐😐😐😐😐😐 it's like listen I know I messed up by not dedicating my life to math but I really need to understand this one concept can you just cool it for a second and help me out

@jk If you want an image of the future, imagine overpriced overhyped broken digital watches with no QA testing being shipped, under different names, forever.

cyberpunk infighting Show more

ribbonfarm.com/2018/05/10/note

this actually makes a lot of sense to me. maybe i should get my life into a position where i'm just doing things too. :p

like, often i find that while i think i want to do things or should want to do things, i never actually get excited about doing them and so don't do them

EPILOGUE

February 3rd. Phil Connors and Rita Hanson get to Phil's apartment after a very long day. Phil pulls out his high school yearbook to show Rita what he looked like as a younger version of himself.

On a lark, he flips over from the C's in the student photos to the R's.

There's no Ned Ryerson.

Rita: "What does this mean? Phil, didn't you say you went to school together?"

Phil: [pause] "It means he needs me."

Both run to Phil's car, destination Punxsutawney.

FIN

birdsite crosspost Show more

recently it has seemed to me that the main trick of computer programming is to learning how to break your problem down into a series of subproblems that turn out to be the subject of entire careers and yearly conferences of various computer scientists

Someone had already put a flag on it, so that was nice to see as well.

Unexpected benefit of visiting Pittsburgh for a funeral this week is visiting my (veteran) dad's grave on Memorial Day.

copied from birdsite Show more

quote-toot Show more

Three equally-dangerous and related fallacies:

"I learned it in a classroom, so it must be true."

"I learned it in a classroom, so it must be the full extent of the information available on the subject."

"I learned it in a classroom, so it must be what the teacher intended for me to learn."

Like Burning Man, but instead, it's Burning Chrome, a mass consensual hallucination, a celebration/solemnization of the reality of our unreality and the unreality of our reality.

Got reminded on birdsite that we're coming up on 25 years of Eternal September this year.

I feel like there should be a gathering or something.

"I started young, fifteen or something, everybody did. The
dream is over now on that. Now it’s populated with the rest
of humanity. Or at least it seems to be. Back then, the
perverts were acceptable, at least, the acceptable perverts
were. You could even joke along with them. Now you can
almost hear the figurative ground sour as it becomes the
badlands." mondo2000.com/2018/03/21/2096/
H/T @enkiv2

How to succeed in tech:
1. Ignore labor law. It's not for people like you.
2. Image is everything. Make sure you seem successful, especially if you're not.
3. Ignore problems until it's too late, then call them inevitable.
4. Bury your failures until an imagined future success turns them into stepping stones.

OLPCΓ’οΏ½οΏ½s $100 laptop was going to change the world Γ’οΏ½οΏ½ then it all went wrong - The Verge theverge.com/2018/4/16/1723394

Fedibrain Show more