*Update on stress-testing Mu*

I'm continuing to play with my prototype postfix calculator. Who knows, it may even become Mu's mythical level-3 language[1].

Today's video demonstrates function definitions that look different from concatenative languages, and a visualization for drilling down into function calls. All in an environment that updates as you type, built up from machine code.

archive.org/details/akkartik-2

(More details: github.com/akkartik/mu)

[1] akkartik.name/post/mu-2019-1

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I wish articles wouldn't talk about data structures like they are only for performance. I've never seen something tame complexity like the clean API of a well thought out data structure.

Judith Butler, via
newstatesman.com/international

"I want to first question whether trans-exclusionary feminists are really the mainstream feminists. If you are right to identify the one with the other, then a feminist position opposing transphobia is a marginal position. I think this may be wrong. My wager is that most feminists support trans rights and oppose all forms of transphobia. So I find it worrisome that suddenly the trans-exclusionary radical feminist position is understood as commonly accepted or even mainstream. I think it is actually a fringe movement that is seeking to speak in the name of the mainstream, and that our responsbility is to refuse to let that happen."

I've been chasing this CNC "bug" for over a week where all the operations on the back of the keyboard were offset a little way and I couldn't figure out why. I double, triple, quadruple-checked everything in software, checked the CNC files did the right thing in a dry-run, all perfect.

Here's a picture of the part and the fixture that holds it while I'm milling the back side, can you spot the problem?

That moment when, on Hackaday.io (attn @hackaday_projectbot ), you are followed by another hacker whom Steve Wozniak himself looks up to.

I'm not sure I deserve such recognition.

The project in question is, of course, hackaday.io/project/170581-vdc , which seems to be receiving a surprising amount of attention (for me, at least).

A few days ago I took some #pictures of the #sunset and combined them into an #AnimatedGif. Today, I was a bit more methodical and so the result is smoother.

#MyWork #MyPhoto #CCBYSA #DSLR #Nikon #D7000 Photography

echo "$(($RANDOM % 9 + 1))" > /dev/udp/lights.climagic.com/45444 # Send a random number 1-9 over UDP to lights.climagic.com on port 45444

The BBC Micro:bit could have been a terrific little platform to teach the basics of assembly, instead it relies on a clusterfuck of half-working tools to teach Typescript.

@emsenn @akkartik Ah yes, the importance of communicating & maintaining software architecture! That *does* need more advocacy!

@akkartik This looks like such a cool project!

Tangent but I really like akkartik.name/post/readable-ba

@alcinnz you might like reading the above, too! I feel like it goes head-on into some issues both of us have expressed.

New demo: a text-mode RPN calculator built up from machine code

archive.org/details/akkartik-2

Inspirations:
* LoGlo (loglo.app/2020-06-16)
* Brief (youtube.com/watch?v=R3MNcA2dpt)

Unlike these, however, this version tries to hew to two principles:
* Show all the data (following spreadsheets and Joshua Horowitz; joshuahhh.com/projects/pane)
* Minimize interaction (following Bret Victor; worrydream.com/MagicInk)

Project page: github.com/akkartik/mu

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There seem to be a parallel between a sailboat and a computer.

We cannot find well-made parts built after the 80s, all the companies making quality products have gone out of business, and the market has been flooded with flimsy plastic garbage.

We finally found what we were looking for today, second-hand, built in 1978. I can't help but think of Jonathan Blow's talk.

It's kind of funny in retrospect that the programming language whose mantra was "There Should Be Only One Way To Do It" featured two separately maintained, incompatible, versions of itself for 11 years.

Funny story

A few weeks ago I built a function to read keystrokes from the keyboard. (In machine code, of course.) I planned to support just ascii keys to begin.

Today I tried to force myself to work on the rest. Terminal escape sequences like arrow keys, utf-8, and somehow distinguishing between the two.

Surprise: both were already working! I just had to read 32 bits rather than 8 from stdin. Legal utf-8 doesn't conflict with terminal escapes in 32-bit space.

github.com/akkartik/mu/commit/

@akkartik @soapdog Great thread! Bookmarked it (mirrored on Nitter) for testing Rhapsode & Haphaestus!

Relatedly I have my own talk on this topic: rhapsode.adrian.geek.nz/smallw

Nice summary of the small web by @soapdog: twitter.com/soapdog/status/130

One implication: in the vein of being the change you want to see in the world, all us 'enlightened' folks need to play with a lot more bespoke browsers and user agents and protocols. It's the only way to carve out an oasis in the desert of monopolies and winner-takes-all.

I recently replaced the link to my email everywhere on my website with one to this 'contact' page: akkartik.name/contact

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