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Allison Parrish @aparrish@mastodon.social

seriously though. and without any increase in validation accuracy. bleah

based on the photo of the instructions on the nyhistory page, here's the letter frequency from hill's spelling blocks, which seems to... roughly follow english letter frequency in general (with some weird outliers, like five Cs but only three As, wayyy too many Js, not enough Zs to spell "pizza" etc). I wonder hill came up with this distribution by the seat of his pants or if he actually did some counting or had some other source

... which isn't to say that I don't kinda *like* my simplest-possible implementation? it's at least doing the work of juxtaposing obvious and non-obvious words that are relevant to the topic and eschewing conventional syntax. so I do feel justified in this approach and like I'm on the right track. here's another...

so I've been working on a computer program to compose poems in the style of Zukofsky's _80 Flowers_, a collection (literal anthology!) of constrained poems written about individual flower varieties. eventually this is going to be a corpus-driven machine-learning thing but just now as a sort of "baseline" I made a generator that just arranges the top forty keywords from the wikipedia page corresponding to each flower in Zukofsky's collection, and the results are... surprising?

here are two very useless choropleths I made in a d3 workshop today: NYC neighborhoods by length of name and NYC neighborhoods according to their position in a list of neighborhood names sorted alphabetically

imo any discussion about the invention of word vectors should include marinetti's use of arithmetic symbols in his poetry (cited here in drucker's _the visible word_)

paragraphs from a markov chain trained on garden plant descriptions from wikipedia

this learn-chinese app is prepping me for some real unusual capers vis-à-vis your typical cake/table spatial relations

holy this description of moth wing coloration is so beautifully musical (from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flame_br)

the folk onomastics of plants in general is just amazing and weird and baffling, e.g. from en.wiktionary.org/wiki/housele

meanwhile, I had no idea about the origin of "bluetooth"

I'm sonifying word vectors in ChucK and this is the only way I could get it to accept fifty floats over OSC in one call

clusters of similar "i"s and accents in Gutenberg's DK font, from a paper that uses computational image analysis to argue that early Gutenberg printing was made from "temporary matrices... made by striking or impressing not a single punch, but a series of smaller, 'elemental' punches" (i.e., glyphs were not individually but by combining letter parts)

trying to match similar line segments, first draft... this doesn't actually look any better than just interpolating the points in their original order, bleah

day's work: drawing hershey fonts with pycairo in pygame and manipulating using midi input (not captured in the gif obviously but I'm controlling the parameters of the drawing with my trusty korg nanokontrol)

this list of forms in the OED for "pollywog" is hilarious to me for some reason. it's like the word just consists of "p-" plus the rest of these sounds in more or less whatever order you feel like

names like these makes it seem like Eadweard is a video game franchise or operating system

combining the dependency tree semantic similarity swap output with the line segment morphing...