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Fun #retrocomputing fact of the day: The #Apple II, one of the first home #computers to have color video support, did not output color video. Show more

Also one thing I left out - this trades resolution for color.

The native output of an Apple II in hi-res mode is 280 pixels wide, and double-hi-res is 560 pixels wide. With the color burst enabled, that becomes effectively 140 pixels.

Some monitors at the time had switches to disable color, if you wanted monochrome graphics - especially important later in the 8-bit Apple II's life, as GUIs started appearing. Unwanted artifact color made text unreadable.

A review that I found of A2Heaven's Apple //c VGA adapter (which has to emulate all of this for color to work at all) illustrates this quite nicely: oldtechnewtech.com/apple-iic-v

Without color enabled, the screen is crisp and perfectly readable: oldtechnewtech.com/wp-content/

With it enabled, it's a complete and total mess: oldtechnewtech.com/wp-content/

And, finally, because apparently hashtags don't work in the content warning, I'll just put them at the end here:

Fun #retrocomputing fact of the day: The #Apple II, one of the first home #computers to have color video support, did not output color video. Show more

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