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You know what I miss? StatusNet's tree-based threading.

@elomatreb Yes, but most UIs since StatusNet haven't exposed these things, other than maybe Reddit

@elomatreb not that I'm advocating Reddit as a place to have conversations (any more... it was a better place for that in 2008)

brennen @brennen

@cwebber @elomatreb it really was, for a minute there, a place that i learned a lot.

apart from everything else wrong with the reddit of now, i suspect the threading worked a lot worse as number of commenters escalated into the hundreds per post.

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@brennen @elomatreb Note that flat comment structures don't scale either. Reddit is pretty bad... imagine how much worse it would be with a *flat* post structure tho! Probably its conversation threading has been one of the few things that *has* scaled.

@brennen @cwebber I wouldn't ascribe too much meaning to technical aspects of a platform like that, if hundreds (or even just tens) of people replied to toot it gets overwhelming for the author and confusing for a potential reader already as well

@elomatreb @cwebber i don't disagree with these things. i think really part of what's meaningful is just scale.

i like a lot about mastodon's community and design goals, but i'd be kidding myself if i didn't think that a lot of what feels right about it is just that it's not overwhelmingly huge.

@brennen @elomatreb Can we make small communities scale up? :)

Legit question! I think we can... a successful peer to peer network with community oriented web of trust type things probably wouldn't be as large and global of a monocommunity of eg twitter while still supporting the scale of twitter, and that may be a Very Good Thing

@cwebber @elomatreb i sincerely hope so. we should be able to scale the social infrastructure without requiring that everybody inhabit the same namespace or rely on the same concentrations of power. that's the whole goal of moving towards the federated / decentralized side of the scale, right?