Took the day off today so I decided to relax by learning how to use a Game Boy disassembler to modify a game to add in SGB support. So far all it does is load a single test palette, but it even works on hardware!

Compiling code and having it work is satisfying, but there's something truly special about squinting at completely illegible disassembly for thirty minutes straight then suddenly having the epiphany "oh, THAT one's the main program loop!"

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Successfully got a custom SGB border loaded. I will not be accepting artistic criticism at this time due to the fact that it’s already perfect

Alright. So here's my first thesis: I can write code that monitors something that the game did in RAM, and adjust the SGB palette on the fly instantly to reaction to the game's current state, without causing any slowdown.

Obviously you wouldn’t ACTUALLY want to react to just “is Samus moving” but that was something that was really easy to check for and trigger a bunch of times rapidly. But you can probably imagine more complex and interesting uses of this technique.

LMAO OH MY GOD I FORGOT MY SCREEN RECORDER WAS CONFIGURED TO DO AUDIO RECORDING TOO. THAT’S FINE. PERFECT ALIGNMENT ON IT

@christinelove you could have a different palette for different areas, like in metroid 1
That's so cool!

@christinelove Not gonna lie, I thought this was entirely intentional, and incredibly funny.

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