I'm slightly bemused by this Wikipedia article that lists programming languages in chronological order.

According to the article, three of the five most recently released languages are C++, C, and Fortran

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline

Now, I get that it's referring to new *versions* of those languages released in the past year or two. But it's not like other languages haven't *also* released new versions/editions. So I'm still not sure what's up with the list.

@codesections It lists K&R C in 1972, C90 in 1988-9, C99, C11, C18 in appropriate years.

Now, what's annoying is it only lists Scheme in 1975, not the R[1-7]RS since then.

@mdhughes

> It lists K&R C in 1972, C90 in 1988-9, C99, C11, C18 in appropriate years. Now, what's annoying is it only lists Scheme in 1975, not the R[1-7]RS since then.

Yeah, that's mostly what I'm getting at. It also doesn't list Rust 2018 (a major release) or JavaScript's ES6 (which, imo, basically transformed JS as a language).

There's probably some logic to it, but it escapes me at the level of effort I'm willing to invest on causal curiosity.

Follow

@codesections @mdhughes I don’t think there’s much logic beyond “whoever edited this page likes C++ and doesn’t care about JS”

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Mastodon

Server run by the main developers of the project 🐘 It is not focused on any particular niche interest - everyone is welcome as long as you follow our code of conduct!