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TIL “In the late 1500s, the English printer Henry Denham proposed using a reverse question mark, ⸮, called a PERCONTATION POINT to indicate that a question was rhetorical and so didn’t require an answer.”

It’s the punctuation we deserve and the one we need right now

Via: twitter.com/haggardhawks/statu

@cypnk

Of course!

Still, like the Oxford comma, it will be forever a bone of contention. :grin:

@cypnk

Absolutely!

Of course, like the Oxford comma, it may be a perpetual...

Wait a sec, Spanish already has an inverted question mark (¿) but it's used as an opening to a question, similar to the paired quote marks or parentheses.

@cypnk The Twitter thread referred to includes a link to this Mental Floss article, "13 Little-Known Punctuation Marks We Should Be Using" [mentalfloss.com/article/12710/], which I also liked.

@iconoclast @cypnk Hot take: We shouldn't be using little known punctuation marks.

But I quite like a few of these.

@cypnk While looking through Unicode tables, I saw a low asterik - ⁎ - and while I have no idea what it is normally used for, maybe it could repurposed into some new form of punctuation.

@Stephen_Stone Oooh, that's interesting. Apparently, it doesn't render in Chrome and I couldn't find an existing use. Definitely worth repurposing

@brennen @cypnk @Stephen_Stone that is probably the origin of the character
a marker for a chapter transition in books

i'm still is the opinion that Unicode needs a universal sub / sup combiner

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