@Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek I'm skeptical of and concerned about commercial exploitation too. Problem is, "noncommercial" doesn't fix the things you'll expect it to, and will prevent things you want.

Here's a question: if Linux were noncommercial, should a community run nonprofit be legally allowed to run it in a commercially run hosting service / datacenter? Even if the hosting service profits from it? Can the cooperative collect dues?

@cwebber @Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek

Have you seen the peer production license? wiki.p2pfoundation.net/Peer_Pr

I think its a bit better than a blanket NC license. What I really want is a license requiring income from a commercial entity be used to improve the software. Either by spending time working on it, or paying for others time.

@alienghic @Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek I think the Peer Production License is a license with good intents and good people that is unfortunately doomed like every other NC approach

@cwebber @Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek

So far the hybrid GPL/commerical license seems to be the most likely to generate funding for developers while still being "Free software"

@alienghic @Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek by that I assume you mean copyleft with proprietary relicensing?

It has some problems sometimes but I'm generally good with it. :)

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@Shamar @cwebber @alienghic @kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek copyleft, Affero-style licensing, etc. are your best bet.

I don't think we'll ever see a license that keeps a work free and freedom-respecting in every possible scenario, for every person on Earth, until the end of human time. That's too tall of an order.

Remember, license enforcement is the flip side of the coin here... and it's difficult or discouraged, usually. There are very heated battles over FOSS enforcement strategy right now.

@diggity @Shamar @cwebber @starbreaker @rysiek

If I don't think eternal copyright is a good idea for creative works, why should it be appropriate for software?

Admittedly I'm not sure we're going to see a penguin books reissue of the first fortran compiler, but still, it should be released to the public domain.

@alienghic @Shamar @cwebber @starbreaker @rysiek I agree, but public domain has proven not to be "good enough" for works that people care strongly about keeping alive... public domain allows locking down of derivatives.

@diggity @Shamar @cwebber @starbreaker @rysiek

I had been wondering what it means to copylefted software when its copyright term expires.

Legal consistency implies that copyleft should end, just like commercial copyright should end.

@alienghic @diggity @Shamar @cwebber @starbreaker and that is indeed the case, but as long as the copyright is in force, copyleft is in force.

And most of the time that's entirely enough, because derivative works become licensed anew. The original's copyright might expire, but the derivative work is still under copyright -- and that's usually where the interesting stuff is happening and what people would like to use (or lock down).

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