@edtechdev hmm some of these feel like stretching to fit good UX design in there regardless of how much sense it makes re: a specific sort of disability, but overall real good

@edtechdev @KitRedgrave
As someone with ASD and a daughter with same: the S means 'spectrum'. The advice might be true for some sufferers, but by absolutely no means all ("don't use primary colours" mystifies me…)

@edtechdev Oh yeah, they have this on the wall in the kitchen in the Microsoft building I'm working in tonight

@edtechdev And for the love of god, if you override one default color in the browser override ALL of them.

@edtechdev I love this! But is there a more accessible version somewhere? Not being facetious - the text on the posted version is a bit hard to read, I can't seem to zoom in to make it clearer.

@edtechdev that's mostly good web design.

The first three posters all suggest to organize the content with headers, don't write nonsensical garbage any maybe use a font that won't give the reader eye cancer

We all benefit from good webdesign - not just people who have a heard time reading text

@edtechdev Very good summary, and goes to show how accessibility and usability go hand-in-hand, as the majority of those are also good usability / UX practice for all users.

@edtechdev @kk I have autistic spectrum and I prefer complex layouts, what’s wrong with me?

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