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trying to follow this instruction:

talk about the things you love, even if you think nobody cares.

people won't ask for it at least at first, but some of them will care

and it's attractive to see someone talk about the things they love.

let go of the notion that it's worthless if you don't get a minimum number of listeners, reactions, replies.

practice caring publicly about the things you care about.

I think this is a good reminder for me. I never liked being shy anyway

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[looking through my vast guitar tablature archive] "whoa man, this one is *ancient*..." "an arrangement of greensleeves, eh? dates to the late 16th century, i believe." "no i mean, i downloaded the text file off usenet in 1997! ancient!!"

[Darth Vader voice] You have one free article left.

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hello mastodon friends - i have a new podcast episode out, continuing the exploration of kitschy 00's staples of indie music. this time me and my cohost look at the band that will "change your life" according to Natalie Portman in a certain 2004 movie, The Shins - and their first album "Oh, Inverted World" kitschfork.podbean.com/e/02-in

Over on badsite a "post a TV show you feel like you're the only one who remembered" prompt was making the rounds. What randomly popped into mind was The Edison Twins, a mid-80s Canadian teen scientist mystery solver show that I caught a few eps of as a wee lad on the Disney Channel. It unearthed a memory of this bizarre scene, which I felt compelled to track down and upload as its own clip: youtube.com/watch?v=ZGMo41cyou

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spending a bit more time with Teardown's lovely 1.0 release. i'm sad that kids who grew up after the 90s will never know the joy of demolishing a mall food court with high explosives.

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Today, May 1, is International Workers' Day! It commemorates the sentencing to death of eight anarchist workers in Chicago who were framed for throwing a bomb at police who attacked a strike demonstration in May 1886 shop.workingclasshistory.com/p

And to be very clear: dreams, even and maybe especially the impossible ones, can be extraordinarily valuable for pushing us towards a better world. But I think it can be important to distinguish them: thing A is something that we have a fair shot at creating someday, and it will help us achieve X; whereas thing B is a dream that will likely never pan out, but it inspires and reminds us why X is important.
Call a dream a dream, and value that for what it is.

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I don't think the answer is to totally disclaim the concept of technology from our notions of "progress" ie How The World Should Change, but I think it tells us something about how we should hold it, in our imaginings and pursuits of brighter futures. It's possible that a particular piece of Good Technology, like the zero-exhaust hoverbus in that Chobani commercial, will only ever be a nice dream, no matter how many resources we pour into actualizing it.

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For one: in practice, under our current economic system, it makes us vulnerable to grandstanding egoists who will *claim* to be our saviors and bring us the Good Technology, but are actually people like Musk. It gives them a sort of moral high ground in the popular consciousness that is rhetorically difficult to displace them from, no matter how big a fraud they are.

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