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getty @keweddji@mastodon.social

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@enkiv2 @jamey @natecull @alanz After this conversation yesterday, I decided to write up a blog post that has some concrete code examples and a slightly longer but still introductory explanation of what row types are specifically: blog.infinitenegativeutility.c

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My favorite part of @keweddji's newest blog post about programming (blog.infinitenegativeutility.c) is the sample program which is valid Ruby source with duck-typing but can also be statically type-checked by the Crystal compiler.

My second-favorite thing is it's a post about duck typing that uses animals in examples but doesn't mention ducks anywhere.

(Quack! 🦆)

@enkiv2 @jamey @natecull @alanz After this conversation yesterday, I decided to write up a blog post that has some concrete code examples and a slightly longer but still introductory explanation of what row types are specifically: blog.infinitenegativeutility.c

@jamey @enkiv2 @alanz @natecull "Structural typing" just means "things type-check if they have the shape that's expected", and it's used in contrast to "nominal typing", which means "things type-check if they have the same declared name." Lots of type systems feature both: in OCaml, for example, most data types are nominally typed, but objects are structurally typed.

@jamey @enkiv2 @alanz @natecull For what it's worth, I talk about row polymorphism a lot in this context, but the high-level idea is really "structural types", of which row types are one specific implementation.

@jamey Would you be able to do it with purely HTML chrome but still embedding some of the logic in Rust? It looks like you can expose callbacks to Rust in the JS, and thereby keep some information out of the webview.

@jamey It's not exactly what you're asking for, but I came across this recently: github.com/huytd/kanban-app

It's not Servo (it's WebKit/MSHTML depending on platform) and it's still building its application logic in JavaScript (via Elm) but it's also embedded in Rust and is a fraction of the size of an Electron app.

(+, alcohol mention) Show more

oh yes also i did some pixels recently

It's easier than you might think to get this working (although right now I've got the framebuffer size hard-coded, and I need to fix that to make it more robust): git.gdritter.com/fb-clock/blob

Yesterday I started to set up Plymouth, got bored, and instead wrote my own boot animation by using Rust+Cairo to write directly to the framebuffer until my login manager has started. This is a pretty good example of my problem-solving approach.

@jamey The story is really only fleshed out by multiple runs, including runs that I very much did not want to do. I ended up relying on other sources to get them all, including this very good (and spoiler-ey) summary and subsequent critique by Michael Lutz correlatedcontents.com/?p=1974

Some Sunday afternoon yak-shaving: a quick-and-dirty `dmenu` application launcher using XDG Desktop Entries instead of using stuff from $PATH: github.com/aisamanra/dmesktop … (written hastily, largely untested, requires Python 3.6 or later)

OH: "Creating a new font in the course of completing a (non-typographic) project is called 'Knuthing it'."

I tried my hand at one of those things: I'm Getty, and I bounce sporadically between ink, paint, pixels, vector art, and block-printing.

…it's worth pointing out that this documentation also has to include the following:
1. some pointers about virtualenv
2. a link to the shellcheck bash linter
3. an explanation of a defunct Scala HTTP library
4. a couple of systemd commands
5. some of the details of Jira's REST API
and that's just scratching the surface!

Trying to write some honest documentation for the absolute worst piece of software I have ever written (and which some poor non-me person will soon have to maintain.)

Good bookstore find at lunch today. (Powell's DOES have an Esperanto section, but it's usually only six books or so.) mastodon.social/media/H_Yo34NB

@swizzard A handful of Esperanto words are literally just English words with -o after them, like sporto, birdo, inko, boato. They're often pronounced differently, though, so e.g. boato is pronounced "boh-AH-toh."