of COURSE this was EXACTLY what we all used our Commodore 64s to do, to balance our budget

also to improve our hand/eye dexterity

Siri, what were the very first RAM addresses we all POKEd

@natecull

I remember a classmate at school messing about with poke on an apple ii.

It ended up with smoke coming out the floppy drive.

@algorev @alanz

POKE put raw data into raw RAM addesses.

Most of the Commodore hardware chips were directly controlled by RAM addresses. No OS preventing you from doing anything.

On early PETs you could actually blow up the screen by setting some kind of refresh rate to the wrong speed or voltage.

Doesn't surprise me you could do the same to a disk drive.

@natecull @alanz @algorev Especially given just how much software control the Apple II had over its drives.

Maybe just leave all four phases of the head stepper motor on? That might be enough to smoke a weak drive...

Also worth noting that a lot of Apple II I/O works on reads (PEEK), not writes.

So, if I wanted to smoke a drive from BASIC, I might try...

10 PEEK(C0EA): REM SELECT DRIVE 1
20 PEEK(C0E1): REM PH0 ON
30 PEEK(C0E3): REM PH1 ON
40 PEEK(C0E5): REM PH2 ON
50 PEEK(C0E7): REM PH3 ON
60 PEEK(C0E9): REM MOTOR ON
RUN

Then just let it sit for a while.

@bhtooefr @alanz @algorev

Yikes I did not know that about Apple II using PEEK to trigger hardware events.

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@bhtooefr @alanz @algorev

cos like I used to write

FOR J = 0 TO 65535: PRINT PEEK(J);: NEXT

all the time on Commodore and IBM PC.

Terrifying to think what I could have done with a small FOR loop on an Apple.

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