You think I am making this up but

<< And the strongest animal, the most formidable, is the bear. If we were able to steal two bearskins and put you both inside them, there is no one alive who would challenge you on the highway! I can think of no better plan than that you disguise yourselves as bears; for they, of all animals, are most like people.' >>

<<'See how I have fared!' she exclaimed. And Alexandra began to dress Emelior first, fastened her in the skin with strong cords, all about her proper clothes, so that, in all honesty, no man would think anything other than that she was a bear, so exactly did each piece join with another. Emelior was delighted and said: 'Dearest Alexandra, how do you like me now? Am I not a handsome bear?'>>

<< Alexandra then wrapped William in the other bearskin. And when he was properly sewn in, William said happily to Emelior: 'Tell me, my sweetheart, how do you like me now?'

'By Mary the mild Queen of Heaven, so strong and fierce a bear you seem to be that I am terrified to look you in the face!'>>

<<William and Emelior made their way quickly through the garden, fiercely on their four feet, as bears do, and happened to encounter one of the new arrivals from Greece, looking at the plants. Terrified out of his wits, he raced out of the garden as fast as feet can run, for he firmly believed that they were pursuing him and would eat him. >>

Don't forget to like and subscribe!

<< So ends the first part of this tale. All who would like to hear more should offer an 'Our Father' to the High King of Heaven for the noble Earl of Hereford, Sir Humphrey de Bohun, nephew of old King Edward who lies at Gloucester. For he is the first to have this tale translated from French into English for the benefit of all Englishmen; whoever prays thus, may God grant him bliss! >>

omg William you giant nerd hurry up and get working on your cosplay

<< Great joy was made in Rome as word of Emelior's betrothal spread. Everyone was happy that Emelior should have made such a marriage, to the heir of the Emperor of Greece! And every man told another, quickly, joyfully, until almost the only man not to know was William, for he was busy playing board games. >>

Update: oh ick the 15th century manuscript compiler Hannah Scot was, uh, burned at the stake for this fanfic collection

so um

maybe be careful who you get to proofread your own furry werewolf romances

eleusinianm.co.uk/middle-engli

<<The words appear to be of fourteenth century origin and may have been copied by Hannah from an earlier collection of tales lying in her father's library, or perhaps she composed them herself.

"The menskful wight swich tales kepe ful dernly and ful yerne, shal wite the lay of Briton clerkys and ancien sothe shal leren."

(The noble person who preserves these tales, with love and with discretion, shall know the creed of the ancient druids and come to understand a long lost belief.) >>

Please make this comic book asap

<< ff. 83–118. Chrétien de Troyes in the twelfth century wrote a compelling adventure set in King Arthur's extended kingdom in which Sir Yvain adopts a lion and becomes known as the Knight of the Lion. Nobody knows who he really is. He goes about in disguise. If this sounds to you like an unusual theme for a medieval romance, you really need to read a few more romances! >>

like does he also dress AS a lion and use lion-themed armour and weapons and leave little hand-machined lion-shaped ninja throw stars, or just fight with a lion at his side

does the lion have a cape

we need to know the answers to these questions

@natecull
(where in here was a singular "they" used? or have you not reached that yet?)

@marlyn I think it is in the untranslated original

<< Here’s the Middle English version: ‘Hastely hiȝed eche . . . þei neyȝþed so neiȝh . . . þere william & his worþi lef were liand i-fere.’ In modern English, that’s: ‘Each man hurried . . . till they drew near . . . where William and his darling were lying together.’ >>

@natecull you don't happen to know where I can find the Middle English version?

I can only seem to find the medieval french and the modern english versions...

@lizardsquid Update: Ding!

At least I think this might be it?

It drops into French occasionally because some folios are lost.

archive.org/details/romanceofw

@natecull I'm assuming this is to prove the "furries" part and not the singular they part? also this book sounds amazing omg

@InspectorCaracal It comes complete with the 1375 equivalent of 'Like and subscribe!'

<< So ends the first part of this tale. All who would like to hear more should offer an 'Our Father' to the High King of Heaven for the noble Earl of Hereford, Sir Humphrey de Bohun, nephew of old King Edward who lies at Gloucester. For he is the first to have this tale translated from French into English for the benefit of all Englishmen; whoever prays thus, may God grant him bliss! >>

lb: I never expected to be called out so hard by 14c. translation of a 12c. story

“Everyone was happy that Emelior should have made such a marriage, to the heir of the Emperor of Greece! And every man told another, quickly, joyfully, until almost the only man not to know was William, for he was busy playing board games.”

@natecull 'Dearest Alexandra, how do you like me now? Am I not a handsome bear?' Is probably the best line of text I have ever read. Thank you for finding this, as it brings joy to my heart (yes this is how I speak now)

@natecull I also like how the author often goes "describing all this would be way to long, just assume it's good"

pronouns, transphobia, the dictionary Show more

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