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A theory:

Americans instinctively trust capitalism the way British instinctively trust the aristocracy.

"It might not be a perfect system, in fact it's terrible, it makes absolutely no sense, it's a weird legacy of the past, it makes everything worse, but it's OUR system, darnit, and no smelly foreigner is taking it away from us"

"And when you see a [dodgy real estate guy in a flash car] [toff hunting foxes on a horse], well, by gosh, it just makes you feel *proud* for your country."

@natecull every time an asshole in a brand new Corvette cuts me off i shed a patriotic tear

@natecull I've literally seen American/Brits use this rhetoric, so I'm fairly certain it's true.

@DissidentKitty I don't even know where New Zealand fits in this situation.

Two weeks ago I would have said 'All Black rugby players', but....

@natecull The only people in England who trust the aristocracy are boomers lmao, if anything America finds them more quaint than we do

@natecull Unfortunately true. I am part of no political party, but some of my ideas border on socialism, and I get looked upon like I am a traitor to my country for not being pro capitalist. Which is a problem, because the blatant pure capitalism here in the U.S. is a cancer without a treatment. 😑

@natecull capitalism and private enterprise.

Had a number of conversations with USAians about power and surveillance, and while they immediately grasped why government surveillance was capital-B Bad, they would almost never agree that surveillance by a huge corporate entity could be as bad.

"Power corrupts but not if you're in the private sector" I guess?

@natecull, funny but, as someone who born after the Soviet Union collapsed in one of the former USSR republics (RSFSR), I instinctively afraid of socialism.

Every time when I see anything pro-socialistic I start to remember the history of my country.

And each time I learn more about the history of my motherland between 1917 and 1991, I start to be afraid of socialism even more.

@natecull "If they didn't vote for a lizard, then the wrong lizard might get in. Got any gin?"

@natecull I think the psychological phenomenon of existence bias supports this. We tend to like what exists over uncertain alternatives.

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