Stefan Sperling is a user on You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse. If you don't, you can sign up here.

Stefan Sperling

The journal is asking for more beta testing of their website rewrite.
Sure looks nice and does not repeat any of the mistakes made many years ago with slashdot's beta :)

Hope all my friends visiting Canada for have a great time hacking this week! 👍🇨🇦

being the inventor of , does them differently than the corporate ones.

it isn't a competition. no prizes. its perfectly fine to not finish. heck, sleep is encouraged.

we work together on making the best we can, and having the domain experts in the same room makes that far easier.

La même, prise au Fujifilm X-T2 cette fois-ci avec le XF55-200mm. Recadrée évidemment.

I love getting patches like this one:

Very simple to write if you know a little bit of C and happen to run into a USB device which is not in the kernel's known device list yet. Every such patch makes it more likely that random devices people pick up in stores will "just work" with .

FYI, if you use Firefox and you're not participating in their Test Pilot program, you're missing out on a lot of good stuff:

Test Pilot lets you opt-in to experimental new features, and then provide feedback on them to determine the shape they take and whether they have a future as an add-on or part of FF core.

Some of the experiments have been really fantastic, so if you want to be the first on your block to have these cool new features, this is how.

Concerning modern compiler optimization, noticed on OpenBSD, which uses ELF sections to initialize objects w/ random data at load by the kernel:

I was given an old scanner some months ago and was worried forever that i could never get it to work with

Turns out all I needed to do was pkg_add sane-backends xsane-gimp

Not even one config file to touch.
Now getting high-resolution colour scans in the gimp :)

Watching an MSNBC interview with Kaspersky and others. There's long been suspicion---Kaspersky Labs being a Russian company---that they can't be trusted. There's numerous classified investigations in the US directed at Kaspersky.

The reporter stated to a former FBI assistant director that Kaspersky offered the source code to the US for review. The response was that that's great, but is that what he is really providing?

This is a world that the free software community will soon be completely immune from with reproducible builds---and we're nearly there. There would be no doubt that some source code is actually what produced a given binary.

Of course, offering the source code for review is another concept we're immune from---we already have it. It doesn't matter that Kaspersky Labs is a Russian company (to me): they're still proprietary. I can't trust them, nor could I trust anyone else who asks me to run their nonfree software. What kind of security is that?

1.10-alpha3 was released today. It is the first public sneak peek of Subversion 1.10.

It contains a new conflict resolver feature I have spent a lot of time developing:

If you use Subversion for some reason somewhere, please test this alpha and provide feedback.

khorben@netbsd did a update on his t440s to plug an Intel hole, and this update removed his (4) pcie card from the bios PCI ID whitelist. No for him no more.

Someone should finally sue over this bios whitelist misconduct. It is in clear violation of common sense and consumer's rights.

Often confusing for new and old users, there's now information about supported graphics hardware on :

2017 et linux a encore des problèmes de son ? Rigolo non ? :)

A bunch of developers are playing with clang builds of , really cool to see a game plan developing.