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Trajectories of the Earth System in the

We explore the risk that selfreinforcing feedbacks could push the toward a planetary threshold that, if crossed, could prevent stabilization of the at intermediate temperature rises and cause continued on a “ ” pathway even as are reduced.

pnas.org/content/115/33/8252

@tuxom Do read it carefully. If I remember it well the paper only explains the concepts but provides no evidence for self-reinforcing feedbacks.

@VictorVenema
Do you have some links to free available papers/articles regarding selfreinforcing feedbacks in climate systems?

@tuxom As far as I know the state of the science is that they do not exist. There is not enough carbon on the Earth to move us to a Venus like hothouse.

In the media the most worried about carbon feedback is the sudden release of a lot of methane in the Arctic. We study this because it it were to happen the consequences would be large, but this is unlike so strong to be self-reinforcing.

In science the strongest methane feedback are actually tropical wetlands. agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.co

@tuxom Thank you for posting this - I forgot to bookmark it at the time and it is a very useful article.
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