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I would like to try collaborative note taking with a wiki in class. What should I think about?

What's a good tool for doing interactive things in classes like surveys and quizzes that is accessible and doesn't harvest students' data? Is there something FOSS that I could put on Sandstorm or something like that?

I got to do logic on a chalkboard on Monday. Today I was in a different room with a whiteboard (and no pens). I had excitedly brought my own chalk.

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Is there a university that has a faculty of history of computing? You know, not just people restoring old hardware or making backups of punch cards, but people writing papers about how programming paradigms evolved, people analyzing how some old systems are similar to other systems, and so on. I think we slowly are gaining enough material for this to deserve its own specialists. Software archaeologists.

Is there a personal activity tracker that uses FOSS and doesn't put data on someone else's computer?

I found the Okinesio project: okinesio.org/

I will be teaching ethics for the first time this term. I predict that students will have more pre-existing views about the topic than when I teach philosophy of language.

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Looking for suggestions:

What is a good tool to check websites for accessibility? Ideally something free and very easy to use for those who don't understand code much. And something that not only points out what's wrong but gives suggestions on how to fix it (if that exists).

Thanks!

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I'd like to query the #Mastodon hivemind about its favorite open-source/distributed/federated/cash-for-service/low-surveillance software products

("/" = "or")

Examples:
#Brave browser
#pinboard.in bookmarks
#turtl.it digital notes
#Morrowind on disc without server login and paid mods...

What else do you recommend?

What's a simple, cheap way to host a static site?

I would like to use e.g. letsencrypt.org/

It would be nice if one place would host my domains too, but that's not essential.

At the moment I have domains registered one place, and I host the site with Fastmail. But I can't support https then. Although for such a simple personal site maybe I don't need to.

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Ho do You manage Your information/knowledge?

Aggregators, feed RSS, reading apps, note apps, social bookmarking?

Let me know :)

twsh boosted

Quick question, oh great and terrible internet brain extension:

What are people's web accessibility pet peeves?

I already have unhelpful/missing alt-text and low contrast text.

I use this all the time for inserting references into papers: github.com/msprev/unite-bibtex

I forked it to work with Vim with Python 3: github.com/twsh/unite-bibtex




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Proposing a new #LibreMonday recurring #hashtag. Who's in?

The idea: #showcase free/libre and open source source (#FLOSS) projects that you like, giving a screenshot and basic information + links.

This should help many of us #Mastodon users discover hidden gems of the #FreeSoftware ecosystem.

Please boost 🍍 and give it a go!

Is there a simple guide to the syntax used on mastodon.social for e.g. links?

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Seems like setting up a @Liberapay wasn't all bad!
Mastodon receives €20.04 per week.

liberapay.com/Mastodon/

And to find other Mastodon related liberapay users? You can check out the community:

liberapay.com/for/Mastodon/

And if you want to throw money at me specifically?
liberapay.com/maloki/

I'm assuming that a sentence content would be a proposition in a roughly Russellian way. So the content of 'Mont Blanc is 4808m tall' is something like <Mont Blanc, being 4808m tall> (i.e. it contains a mountain and a property).

Here is the question I'm thinking about this week. A lot of recent work in philosophy of language focuses on the question of what the contents of various (types of) sentences are and how they relate to what we use them to say. What is the best reason for thinking that sentences have contents, in this sense, at all? What does the notion help explain? What would be wrong with a theory that entailed that not all sentences had contents, or that a range of sentences lacked them?

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Given that this (mastodon.social) is most shared instance, to preserve the ideals of decentralization we have closed sign ups in favour of spreading new users through the various alternative instances

— you get access to the same network wherever you sign up —

You can find a lot of these instances here:
instances.mastodon.xyz/

And share this with your friends: joinmastodon.org/

Here's a claim that I like but I'm not sure that I know how to argue for: a theory of language that entails that speakers are very often very wrong about how language works is *ceteris paribus* worse than one that doesn't.