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Vítor De Araújo @vbuaraujo@mastodon.social

My eyes just passed by the words "privacy policy" and I read "privacy fallacy" instead.

Now I'm wondering that it would make sense for a lot of websites to call their privacy policy that. "By creating an account, you agree to our privacy fallacy."

*we're engaging in rigorous intellectual debate*

me: ... therefore, my argument is correct. Now, look at this picture of a lovely dog

you: this is the Nice Dog Fallacy!!! Nice Dog Fallacy!!!!!!!

crowd: *murmuring* it is a very nice dog though

step outside for a few minutes with the laptop sitting open on the table and get back to find the cat has opened 15 new browser tabs, turned off the wifi, and tried to login as a different user.

i think his skills are escalating.

@Elizafox @bhtooefr I just saw this today which is an interesting initiative. Kind of a "shots fired" thing on Mozilla. That's why I love them. https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/facebook-container/

Regarding Facebook tracking non-users Mark Zuckerberg said "This kind of data collection is fundamental to how the internet works."

I'm not a networking expert but I know enough to be able to confidently say that nothing at all about this data collection is fundamental to how the Internet works. I guess he was using Silicon Valley speak where "the internet" means "huge corporations who make most of their money by selling ads and illegally collecting as much data as possible".

Mastodon was briefly mentioned in this Brazilian article. tab.uol.com.br/crise-facebook/

"Outra alternativa proposta é criar um protocolo aberto para redes sociais – como o e-mail – capaz de funcionar com apps e empresas independentes. É mais ou menos como funciona a Mastodon."

"Another proposed alternative is to create an open protocol for social media – like email – capable of working with apps and independent companies. It's kind of how Mastodon works."

I'm scared as f*ck every time I see this message

@lain I was shooting heroin and reading “The Fountainhead” in the front seat of my privately owned police cruiser when a call came in. I put a quarter in the radio to activate it. It was the chief. “Bad news, detective. We got a situation.” “What? Is the mayor trying to ban trans fats again?” “Worse. Somebody just stole four hundred and forty-seven million dollars’ worth of bitcoins.” The heroin needle practically fell out of my arm. “What kind of monster would do something like that? Bitcoins are the ultimate currency: virtual, anonymous, stateless. They represent true economic freedom, not subject to arbitrary manipulation by any government. Do we have any leads?” “Not yet. But mark my words: we’re going to figure out who did this and we’re going to take them down … provided someone pays us a fair market rate to do so.” “Easy, chief,” I said. “Any rate the market offers is, by definition, fair.” He laughed. “That’s why you’re the best I got, Lisowski. Now you get out there and find those bitcoins.” “Don’t worry,” I said. “I’m on it.” I put a quarter in the siren. Ten minutes later, I was on the scene. It was a normal office building, strangled on all sides by public sidewalks. I hopped over them and went inside. “Home Depot™ Presents the Police!®” I said, flashing my badge and my gun and a small picture of Ron Paul. “Nobody move unless you want to!” They didn’t. “Now, which one of you punks is going to pay me to investigate this crime?” No one spoke up. “Come on,” I said. “Don’t you all understand that the protection of private property is the foundation of all personal liberty?” It didn’t seem like they did. “Seriously, guys. Without a strong economic motivator, I’m just going to stand here and not solve this case. Cash is fine, but I prefer being paid in gold bullion or autographed Penn Jillette posters.” Nothing. These people were stonewalling me. It almost seemed like they didn’t care that a fortune in computer money invented to buy drugs was missing. I figured I could wait them out. I lit several cigarettes indoors. A pregnant lady coughed, and I told her that secondhand smoke is a myth. Just then, a man in glasses made a break for it. “Subway™ Eat Fresh and Freeze, Scumbag!®” I yelled. Too late. He was already out the front door. I went after him. “Stop right there!” I yelled as I ran. He was faster than me because I always try to avoid stepping on public sidewalks. Our country needs a private-sidewalk voucher system, but, thanks to the incestuous interplay between our corrupt federal government and the public-sidewalk lobby, it will never happen. I was losing him. “Listen, I’ll pay you to stop!” I yelled. “What would you consider an appropriate price point for stopping? I’ll offer you a thirteenth of an ounce of gold and a gently worn ‘Bob Barr ‘08’ extra-large long-sleeved men’s T-shirt!” He turned. In his hand was a revolver that the Constitution said he had every right to own. He fired at me and missed. I pulled my own gun, put a quarter in it, and fired back. The bullet lodged in a U.S.P.S. mailbox less than a foot from his head. I shot the mailbox again, on purpose. “All right, all right!” the man yelled, throwing down his weapon. “I give up, cop! I confess: I took the bitcoins.” “Why’d you do it?” I asked, as I slapped a pair of Oikos™ Greek Yogurt Presents Handcuffs® on the guy. “Because I was afraid.” “Afraid?” “Afraid of an economic future free from the pernicious meddling of central bankers,” he said. “I’m a central banker.” I wanted to coldcock the guy. Years ago, a central banker killed my partner. Instead, I shook my head. “Let this be a message to all your central-banker friends out on the street,” I said. “No matter how many bitcoins you steal, you’ll never take away the dream of an open society based on the principles of personal and economic freedom.” He nodded, because he knew I was right. Then he swiped his credit card to pay me for arresting him. The End.

@rixx By far my favorite explanation for not using git is this: stevelosh.com/blog/2013/04/git

It's less about explaining and reasons, and more about how it simply feels hostile to the user.

I can't even begin to say how much I love the sheer cross-conceptual nerdery of this.

"For a real-world example, they pointed to Gilead Sciences, which markets treatments for hepatitis C that have cure rates exceeding 90 percent. In 2015, the company’s hepatitis C treatment sales peaked at $12.5 billion. But as more people were cured and there were fewer infected individuals to spread the disease, sales began to languish. Goldman Sachs analysts estimate that the treatments will bring in less than $4 billion this year. [1]

arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20

“[Gilead]’s rapid rise and fall of its hepatitis C franchise highlights one of the dynamics of an effective drug that permanently cures a disease, resulting in a gradual exhaustion of the prevalent pool of patients,” the analysts wrote. The report noted that diseases such as common cancers—where the “incident pool remains stable”—are less risky for business." [2]

Oh reddit. "During the Cold War, Finland secretly smuggled more than ten thousand vowels from Czechoslovakia. That's why the Finnish have sentences like 'Älä rääkkää kääkkää kääkänrääkkääjä!' and the Czechs have 'Strč prst skrz krk.'"

this social networking thing

it's wrong

the federation attempt is for countering the siloes

But when we had blogs and blog rolls we were better off

We wrote more, more thoughtfully

Today most blogs seem abandoned and their owners are here or on twitter blabberring all the time.

Me included, of course

it's a net loss