Briefly talked about Bitcoin to someone the other day. The good old usual "Seems interesting" → "They cost HOW MUCH?" → "Ah well, that's way too expensive for me."
Even pointing out you can own less than 1 did not change their opinions particularly.

Of the people I've talked to over the years, the one that seemed to have done the most research decided Ethereum was the shit, cause Bitcoin is boring and Ethereum lets you do cool stuff. So he holds that.

Other guy who was into stocks and stuff got some ripple and other shitcoins. I guess not having even a single one is... unfulfilling to people.

Quiz: you buy (A) $100 worth of btc = 0.01 btc, (B) $100 worth of shitcoinX = 10000 scX. The price of your coin goes +10%.

I don't think re-denominating btc into more manageable amounts (1 blarfcoin = .00001 btc (current price ~= $1 USD)) is gonna help, but who knows. It feels like there is a narrative void, and shitcoin marketing teams are doing all they can to fill it.

@kallewoof I think the shitcoin marketing will one day lose its effect in this respect: after a certain number of hype cycles, the layman will more easily come to recognize that bitcoin remains at the top, while the top shitcoins change each cycle.

In any case, if someone really can’t get past the ‘need to own >1 coin’ thing, I’m not sure they’ll be able to ‘get it’ otherwise. That kinda sounds pretentious, but I think you’ll get what I mean.

@htimsxela I do. But I think there's a psychological barrier that is beyond the normal for buying bitcoin, which I think is something that could actually be addressed. Someone mentioned the Andreas Antonopoulos (sp) way of "I'll give you a small amount after the session" as one alternative. I like that idea a lot.

@kallewoof
100% agree. When I first read about Bitcoin it sounded hard, and kinda scary to engage with. Send money to some sketchy looking website? Meet some sketchy person to buy? Was I really downloading the right software? etc

When I eventually came back to it and managed to get a hold of a small amount, it seemed easy in hindsight. Giving someone a small amount and showing them how it works seems like an easy entry.

@htimsxela @kallewoof I'm not so sure about this, I used to do that in 2015 - 2016, I'm pretty sure some people I gave the equivalent of 5-10€ at the time lost it, and the others I don't know.
As time passed and they can see that Bitcoin is here to stay and steadily gaining value it will be easier to convince people to get in. I'm not in a hurry I know it will take a lot of time

@Sosthene
I don't think whether or not they lose the money in the end is relevant in this context. If Andreas does a talk he'll count that money in his fee and it just serves as an example.
If you do a similar talk, you either accept to spend that money on aiding the talk or. What happens with it after is irrelevant.
Except for UTXO spam of course :D
@htimsxela @kallewoof

@stevenroose @htimsxela @kallewoof no but what's relevant is "did they grow an interest out of it? Did it incite them to learn and eventually hold more bitcoins by themselves?", and the answer is "no" as far as I'm concerned. It might work for Andreas, probably because, well, he's Andreas and being way more convincing than I am 🙂
I'd rather not distribute my bitcoins altruistically if I don't even get the satisfaction to make more converts, so I'm trying other ways now

@Sosthene
Any other ways that turn out more successful? Sadly in my experience I can't seem to convince anyone if it isn't because they can make money :/
Then again, I can't seem to convince anyone in the same social circles that privacy is important.
@htimsxela @kallewoof

@stevenroose @Sosthene @htimsxela @kallewoof

Perhaps, to be cynical, they correctly intuit that the only way of getting good privacy is to get rich first? :)

In the long term, I don't even think my joke quite works, I think eventually nyms in some form will be a crucial concept (separation/isolation of digital identities). But I'll probably be dead by the time that really matters.

@waxwing @stevenroose @htimsxela @kallewoof I read an article years ago about suppressing the official identity used by government, ie anyone can have as many identities as he wants either on or offline.
It was of course provocative but I liked it a lot, I should try to find it again

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@Sosthene @stevenroose @htimsxela @kallewoof

"True Names" by Vernor Vinge was written a **long** time ago, but is a really forward thinking piece of fiction about nyms in the digital/virtual world. It's short, and entertaining too. Adam Back is always recommending it.

He also wrote "A Fire Upon The Deep" which is one of my favourite scifi books, breathtakingly imaginative.

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