@yogthos English is more the Java of natural languages.

See, there's a huge difference.

JavaScript:
Everywhere
Has ridiculous limitations
Was written in a weekend
Imprecise
No import feature

Java:
Everywhere, but as a business language
Has only a few odd limitations, but lots of great features to do whatever you need once you learn them
Evolved from trying to bridge barriers, succeeded
All the precision you need
Import what you need, even mix with other languages

JavaScript is lolspeak.

@yogthos I would have put German, French, etc. more as C family languages.

I do see your logic, but I think it does a disservice to the flexibility of English and the fact that if you delve past what's in common use, you find an excellent library, which is very unlike JS.

Of course we could meet in the middle on VB, because VB is only as strict as you make it (formal vs. informal writing).

@bluestarultor @yogthos Just yesterday: blob.cat/objects/b28e7b7e-3c7c

Also I have very strong objection about the "precision":
Familiarize yourself with some Slavic languages. You can't express the difference between "отворено/затворено" and "открито/закрито" in English. "Открито море" = "Open sky", "Отворено (магазин)" = "open (store)". This is in Bulgarian.
Another example in Russian:
youtube.com/watch?v=SmtwrQ_wLr
This all is gibberish but it plays with the ability to construct words from other words with prefixes and suffixes (хуй = male sexual organ (vulgar)). That is totally inexpressible in English:
youtube.com/watch?v=SmtwrQ_wLr

@bluestarultor @yogthos And don't even start with the expressions where one word means totally different things depending on the context. This can't be called "precision" (imagine you haven't experienced given context).
Example "free":
dictionary.cambridge.org/us/di
merriam-webster.com/dictionary

In a precise language most of these are expressed with different words.

@_1751015 @yogthos This is why I said "all the precision you need" and not "precise."

I took a good deal of French and am fully aware that other languages have a degree of precision that English couldn't match in 100 years. I find that analogous to Java's lack of unsigned types.

OTOH, I would say gendered languages are more like C or its derivatives. Something like your Russian example is more like Assembly.

I used Java because it's imperfect. And also because it's oft hated. XD

@bluestarultor @yogthos That's exactly the problem with English. As a non-native speaker hearing "precision" and then explanation it depends on the subjective view is a total mess. "Precision" involves objectiveness. No room for "personal", "opinion" or some other "softness".

Just like JavaScript number types - floating-point numbers are barely OK. Most JavaScript developers don't even know about the problems with this type of representation. But because you know better (number types in Java and the other sane languages from a number-types view) you complain for a missing unsigned types. But if you only know JavaScript and only floating-point numbers it will not be easy task to explain to you what is wrong with this stuff :thinkingcat:

@_1751015 @yogthos Honestly I don't think JS only using singles for all numbers and only being accurate to 15 digits is uncommon knowledge.

However, if we really want to talk about lack of precision, let's talk Japanese - a language where there isn't even a word for a singular person that can't also mean plural.

Japanese is an incredibly vague language. What programming language would that be? Something quantum?

This is why 1:1 comparisons will ultimately fail.

@_1751015 @yogthos There are degrees of precision and my language accounted for that. There are different CATEGORIES of precision. Throwing everything behind the precision of numbers ignores things like gender, tonality, other various homonyms and homophones, etc.

Aside from that, the English language has tons of words that are less ambiguous. To use "free," how about "liberated" or "costless?"

@_1751015 @yogthos At any rate, I jumped in for a little fun. It wasn't meant to be taken as an insult or even that seriously.

As a native speaker of one language, you will always find limitations in other languages. French is a pain for LGBT+ because there's no provision for non-binary people.

The same goes for programming languages. The difference is that one is intended for art and the other for science.

@bluestarultor @yogthos
I've made myself clear what I'm objecting and why. I've tried to explain. Will you try to understand the explanation is up to you.
I don't see a case to argue about the meaning of "precision":
dictionary.cambridge.org/dicti "the quality of being exact"
dictionary.cambridge.org/dicti "in great detail, or complete, correct, or true in every way"

P.S. You've missed to mention the case of "You" in English.
"The personal pronoun you is the second-person personal pronoun, both singular and plural,..."
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You
I would say "very Japanese" :blobcatsmile:

@_1751015 @yogthos I guess we agree to disagree. We have workarounds for that as well, but I really don't appreciate being treated like an idiot with no concept of other languages.

It's been not very fun.

Ta.

@kirjis @yogthos I would not dispute this. I can't articulate WHY, but it seems right somehow. XD

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