Pinned toot

We've just open Aixeta, a non-profit platform for ongoing crowdfunding!

All surplus will be returned to the community, via donations, awards or any other idea we may come up with.

For now only creators based in Spain can receive money from subscriptors (we're working on the legal issues to make it available elsewhere), but anyone can create a profile and at least show the world what you're doing.

I'm proud and thrilled to be part of this as the lead developer 🤘

aixeta.cat/en

I love this small but super useful feature in Firefox which tells you how much you're zooming in a website

Hint: surveillance capitalism isn’t a problem just because of the surveillance. The problem has two parts. It’s right there in the name.

Dear America,
Please stop using the term “leader of the free world”.

Sincerely,

A free inhabitant of the world who doesn’t consider your orange puppet (or any other person living in your White House) his leader.

Ah! I should have listened at math class. Who would have thought I'd become a programmer who has to do some numbers!

I hate numbers. Words are funnier.

Join me in asking climate denier Gian Franco Kasper to resign as President of the International Ski Federation.

It’s well past time for us to . Climate change is real and outdoor and snowsports enthusiasts demand action now:

p2a.co/dYSDGcl

There is an increasing number of free (as in freedom) smartphone apps that require other, non-free system components to work. Examples:

- Briar requires Bluetooth for the initial hookup
- Firefox, Tor Browser (and others) require a proprietary graphics renderer
- Conversations expects a working camera to scan QR codes for contact verification

The result is that these apps are either useless or require workarounds on actually free operating systems, such as #Replicant. This trend is concerning.

What's a good resource to start learning about ? Specially about reversible encryption, such as messages that need to be stored *and* displayed.

I literally have no idea, but I guess there are widely spread practices for that. Just don't know where to start. I don't mind paying.

I can understand journalists not having the ability to effect change in a publication’s dodgy practices and funding model.

But this article is written by “The Editorial Board.”

Some people (a lot, probably) like to use tests as documentation. I think this is fine for libraries, since it's an easy way for developers to explore the options available and the expected results. This leads to very granular, almost forensic tests.

However, that's not what I want in an app. Here I don't want documentation, but a system report. I want to know if the tool works as expected. That's why I try to keep tests as high level as possible and only go granular when necessary.

What's your approach to manage translations in Rails apps that gives edit access to non-developers?

We've been storing regular translation files in Dropbox, but when working on multiple branches that add/change/replace translations it becomes hard to manage…

Tips?

If you need to threaten users to comply, maybe your business model is a bit broken.

PlayGround workers are fighting for their jobs after the company has announced a bunch of layoffs.

According to the company Facebook's algorithm is to blame, since changes introduced recently have led to a decrease of views of their videos.

Workers say this is bullshit.

❝Maybe it’s time we need an algorithmic oath for programmers:
I will program no harm by privacy theft, attention hoarding, radicalization optimization.
I will not put engagement metrics above the humans they are extracted from.❞
— DHH

Source: twitter.com/dhh/status/1091373

If you have submitted patches (or translations) to Mastodon before and they've become part of the software, you can go here:

opencollective.com/mastodon/ex

And submit an invoice for your work 💰

Can't we just read an article anymore without publishers wanting to do all sort of stuff with our data?

At least, thanks to GDPR now they're forced to tell us.

@beatmage @carlesjove
❝The song we’re composing already exists in potential. Our work is to find it.❞
— Steven Pressfield, in his great book "Do the Work"

What a wonderful album, from 1989.

Wish I could get around a copy, but seems to have been out of stock for ages.

youtube.com/watch?v=yTdG4QxP9x

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