Pinned post

I started comparing 🔊 🎤 audio players for kids 🎵 🧒 tonight. Only a few for now, I’m sure many more exist…

So if anyone else is looking for one, here is the table (work in progress): app.spreadsheet.com/workbooks/

nicolas boosted

#FR Connaissez-vous des initiatives et des praticiennes du design ou de la conception au sens large (incluant le numérique / développement) impliquées dans la thématique de la #démocratie, de la fabrique des lois, des nouvelles formes de faire société, etc. ? Si cela vous parle, faites-moi signe :) Merci pour vos boosts !

That’s it! Enough about crates. But this might be a story to be continued…

Show thread

As for Aykasa themselves, they redid their website to focus on the home usage of their product: aykasa.com.tr/

Show thread

In the meantime, it seems that another Danish company, WeSupply, became the official distributor for the Aykasa crates: we.supply/brand/aykasa/

Show thread

The question is who broke up with who, what happened behind the scenes?

Show thread

Last chapter of the saga. Visiting the HAY main store in Copenhagen earlier this week, the Aykasa crates were not there. Instead, there was a new model, as similar to the original as any of the other off-brands, with the letters H, A, Y molded into the plastic. Made in China.

Show thread

Other Danish stores started to make their own versions. The COOP supermarkets are selling their own. The JYSK furniture store are selling their own. They are all pretty much the same, but are distinguishable by the shape of their cut-outs and how the plastic material feel.

Show thread

As years passed, the crates made their appearances into more and more shops, less and less fancy ones. Toy shops are selling them as toy storage for kids, decoration stores as a practical home item, art and office supply shops as boxes for supplies. But always sold under the HAY brand. They became commonplace in many stores and I imagine a familiar sight in Danish homes.

Show thread

It seems that the crate design might have evolved slightly (we got some more along the years, they *are* practical). Originally showing the Aykasa logo, there are some that only show the model name, some nothing at all, but they are all made in Turkey.

Show thread

What HAY did was to import the industrial crates and sell them for a different usage than what they were originally intended. At a much higher price as well, one can imagine.

Show thread

Not a fancy Scandinavian home-decor product at all, but a food logistics solution by a Turkish company called Aykasa Polimer: foodlogistics.aykasa.com.tr/in

Show thread

We realised afterwards that these boxes were available in many other posh design shops across the city. And they were all sold as a product from HAY, a well-known design brand around here.

Show thread

Several years ago, in the shop of the contemporary art museum Arken, among all the art and objects, we found some plastic crates that were quite nice. They were foldable, could be piled up, and there were a lot of colours and a few different sizes that could nest instead each other. A little expensive, but practical. We got a couple for storage around the house.

Show thread

So this takes places around , where I live, but I hear the trend might have crossed borders too.

Show thread

For some reason, today I’m finding myself making a thread about plastic boxes. I actually had it drafted for one or two years and never published it, but some exciting new drama in this captivating saga made me complete it today 🙃

Show older
Mastodon

The original server operated by the Mastodon gGmbH non-profit